Status
Funded

Prevent Logging in The Heart of The Congo

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Project Overview

Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park in the northern Republic of the Congo is one of the last remaining wild places on the planet.

  • Species at Risk

    6

  • Carbon stored

    6,651,650*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)

  • 26,049 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: $570,554
Funding Raised: $570,554

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Republic of Congo
Acres

26,049

Project Overview

Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park in the northern Republic of the Congo is one of the last remaining wild places on the planet.

  • Species at Risk

    6

  • Carbon stored

    6,651,650*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)

  • 26,049 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: £413,444
Funding Raised: £413,444

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Republic of Congo
Acres

26,049

Expand Protection for Gorillas and Elephants

Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park in the northern Republic of the Congo is one of the last remaining wild places on the planet. It’s 1-million acres of lowland tropical rainforest contain no human settlements or roads and forests that have never been logged.

Abbuting the Park is a pristine 26,049-acre forest known as the Djeke Triangle. This region is home to large undisturbed populations of charismatic threatened mammal species such as Western Gorillas (CR), Chimpanzees (EN) and African Elephants (VU). But this pristine forest is at grave threat from logging and poaching – we must act now.

Explore the Republic of the Congo

The Endangered Chimpanzee, by firgint
1 of 3

The Endangered Chimpanzee, by firgint

2 of 3

The Endangered Giant Ground Pangolin, courtesy Oregon State University

Forest Elephants walking in the grasses
3 of 3

The African Forest Elephant (CR). Elephant tusks are a prize in the ivory trade.

The Threat

Stop Poaching and Save Species

Rainforest Trust is teaming up with our local partner, Wildlife Conservation Society, to expand the existing 1,000,000-acre Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park by the additional 26,049 acres in the Djeke Triangle.

This expansion will safeguard threatened species like Giant Ground Pangolins (EN), African Golden Cats, as well as 19 primate species, including Oustalet’s Red Colobus. Surveys have revealed that some of our world’s most iconic mammals thrive here in large populations–– approximately 2,170 gorillas, 3,020 chimpanzees and 3,170 elephants live within Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park.

What We're Doing

Save Intact Rainforest

With responsible development of tourism, this small expansion could be a source of financial stability and sustainability for the entire Park.

The unique forests of the Djeke Triangle and Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park are some of the most lush and intact in the country. In fact, while there is little or no local endemism in this region of Central Africa, the Triangle is extremely unusual in that it holds all of the original species of the region in ecologically pristine proportions. Your support will allow these forests to continue safely functioning as a full ecologically intact system–– from the largest to the smallest ‘ecological engineers’, from forest elephants to termites.

Partnering to Save Rainforest

Our partners’ ability to work with their governments and build strong connections with local communities ensures the successful implementation of our projects.

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100% of your money goes to our conservation efforts

Our board members and other supporters cover our operating costs, so you can give knowing your whole gift will protect rainforests.

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