The Andean Condor, by Fominaya Photo
2X THE IMPACT

Secure a New National Park for Rare Species in Argentina

DOUBLE YOUR DONATIONDOUBLE YOUR DONATION
Project Overview

Mining and agriculture encroachment threaten the survival of rare species found in Argentina’s magnificent Sierra de Famatina mountain range.

  • Species at Risk

    Crowned Solitary Eagle (EN), Andean Cat (EN), Riojan Mountain Frog (EN), Thorntail Mountain Lizard (VU), Taruca (VU)

  • Carbon stored

    6,202,366 mT*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Natura International Argentina

  • 431,200 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: $1,324,961
Funding Raised: $146,802

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Argentina
Acres

431,200

Project Overview

Mining and agriculture encroachment threaten the survival of rare species found in Argentina’s magnificent Sierra de Famatina mountain range.

  • Species at Risk

    Crowned Solitary Eagle (EN), Andean Cat (EN), Riojan Mountain Frog (EN), Thorntail Mountain Lizard (VU), Taruca (VU)

  • Carbon stored

    6,202,366 mT*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Natura International Argentina

  • 431,200 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: £996,211
Funding Raised: £110,377

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Argentina
Acres

431,200

YOUR DONATION WILL HAVE

2X

the Impact! Your donation will be matched 1:1 up to $50,000 thanks to the SAVES Challenge.

Project Overview

Argentina’s Sierra de Famatina mountain range is abundant in biodiversity and endemism. From lush lowlands and wetlands to soaring mountaintops of 20,500 feet elevation, the Famatina region provides the perfect home for threatened species including the Crowned Solitary Eagle (EN), Riojan Mountain Frog (EN) and the Andean Condor (VU).

This is the only place on Earth where the Famatina Chinchilla Rat is found. This small mammal is so elusive that its threatened status is yet to be discovered. This project will contribute to understanding the species’ habits and population status.

Habitat destruction and fragmentation resulting from mining and agriculture combined with unregulated tourism and hunting are the greatest threats to life here. Rainforest Trust and our local partner, Natura International Argentina are working to establish the new 431,300-acre Famatina National Park. This park will provide a vital refuge for the imperiled and unique species living here.

Header photo: The Vulnerable Andean Condor, by Fominaya Photo

Explore the Sierra de Famatina Mountain Range

Andean Condor, by Eric Kilby
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Andean Condor, by Eric Kilby

Famatinanthus decussatus, courtesy Natura International Argentina
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Famatinanthus decussatus, courtesy Natura International Argentina

The Thorntail Mountain Lizard, courtesy Natura International Argentina
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The Thorntail Mountain Lizard, courtesy Natura International Argentina

The Endangered Crowned Solitary Eagle
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The Endangered Crowned Solitary Eagle, by Ksenia Ragozina

Andean Mountain Cat (EN)
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Andean Mountain Cat (EN), photo copyrighted free use from Wikimedia Commons

Taruca or Andean Deer, by Milton Rodriguez
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Taruca or Andean Deer, by Milton Rodriguez

Did you know?

10.5 ft

Is the maximum wingspan of the Andean Condor

Safeguard Rare and Beloved Species in a New National Park

In addition to the Crowned Eagle and the Condor, the landscape is home to the Taruca (VU), a mid-sized deer native to the Andes in South America. Much beloved, it has been declared a National Natural Monument to represent Argentina’s natural and cultural heritage.

The proposed national park is one of the most important zones for endemic plants in Argentina. There are 28 resident endemic plants found here, including the Sacansa, a shrub in the daisy family, that grows on sandstone outcrops found in the Famatina range.

The area also lies within the northern boundary of the historic range of the Andean Cat (EN). Similar in size to a common house cat, with fewer than 1,400 individuals remaining in Argentina, Bolivia and Chile, this feline is the most threatened cat in South America. Scientists will be placing camera traps to learn if the cat is able to re-establish a population here once the national park is created.

Champion Local Communities’ Fight Against Mega-Mining

Rainforest Trust partner Natura International Argentina has been working in the Sierra de Famatina region for more than eight years, engaging with community stakeholders, local NGOs and government officials to reach consensus on how they want to protect this territory. The creation of Famatina National Park in Argentina is a historic opportunity to resolve the long-standing struggle of neighboring communities against mega-mining in this region.

Once the park is designated, eco- and cultural tourism livelihood programs will be developed with community members from the five municipalities around the proposed park.

Macaw

We Value Transparency.

Conservation work is critical, challenging, and can be costly. We work hard to ensure we raise only the funds needed for each project. In the rare case we raise more money than needed or a project comes in under budget, excess monies will be transferred to the Conservation Action Fund. This fund supports our important conservation work throughout the tropics.

Learn more about the Conservation Action FundLearn more about the Conservation Action Fund

Partnering to Save Rainforest

Our partners’ ability to work with their governments and build strong connections with local communities ensures the successful implementation of our projects.

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100% of your money goes to our conservation efforts

Our board members and other supporters cover our operating costs, so you can give knowing your whole gift will protect rainforests.

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