White-bellied Cinclodes, Peru, by Agami Photo Agency
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Save the Amazon: Protect Half a Million Acres in Southern Peru

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Project Overview

Rare wildlife are at grave risk of extinction as illegal activities encroach on their rainforest home in the Peruvian Amazon.

  • Species at Risk

    Sira Curassow (CR), White-bellied Cinclodes (CR)

  • Carbon stored

    121,309,442 mT*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Confederación de Nacionalidades Amazónicas del Perú (CONAP)

  • 500,000 Proposed Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: $2,439,169
Funding Raised: $2,057,687

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Peru
Proposed Acres

500,000

Project Overview

Rare wildlife are at grave risk of extinction as illegal activities encroach on their rainforest home in the Peruvian Amazon.

  • Species at Risk

    Sira Curassow (CR), White-bellied Cinclodes (CR)

  • Carbon stored

    121,309,442 mT*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Confederación de Nacionalidades Amazónicas del Perú (CONAP)

  • 500,000 Proposed Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: £2,015,842
Funding Raised: £1,633,085

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Peru
Proposed Acres

500,000

The Peruvian Amazon is second in size only to the Brazilian Amazon, covering nearly 60% of Peru’s landscape and supporting the life of over 12,810 species. These forests are also home to hundreds of Indigenous communities who rely on this land for their survival. As one of our planet’s most important carbon stores, the Peruvian Amazon is vital in the global fight against climate change and contains over 49 billion metric tons of CO₂ equivalents.

Wildlife dependent on this ecosystem—many already on the brink of extinction—find shelter in these forests. But illegal logging, mining and land trafficking are imperiling these species. At the same time, these encroaching activities are jeopardizing the sovereignty of Indigenous territories and traditions.

Rainforest Trust is working with partner Confederación de Nacionalidades Amazónicas del Perú and supported by the International Land Coalition to secure land tenure rights on 500,000 acres of Indigenous territories in some of the last remaining tracts of Amazon rainforest in Peru. Together, we will support at least 30 Indigenous communities urgently wanting to conserve their lands. Once protected, these acres will safely store 121,309,442 metric tons of CO₂ equivalents—comparable to the CO₂ emissions from consuming 13 billion gallons of gas.

Header photo:  The White-bellied Cinclodes, by Agami Photo Agency

Discover the Peruvian Amazon

Sira Curassow, by Hanin Baset
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Sira Curassow, by Hanin Baset

Sira Curassow, by Scarc
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Sira Curassow, by Scarc

Photo from a Ucayali project site, courtesy of partner CONAP
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Photo from a Ucayali project site, courtesy of partner CONAP

Photo from a Ucayali project site, courtesy of partner CONAP
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Photo from a Ucayali project site, courtesy of partner CONAP

Photo from a Ucayali project site, courtesy of partner CONAP
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Photo from a Ucayali project site, courtesy of partner CONAP

A local community member and resident of the project site, courtesy of partner CONAP
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A local community member and resident of the project site, courtesy of partner CONAP

Local community members and residents of the project sites, courtesy of partner CONAP
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Local community members and residents of the project sites, courtesy of partner CONAP

A local community member and resident of the project site, courtesy of partner CONAP
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A local community member and resident of the project site, courtesy of partner CONAP

Local community members and residents of the project sites, courtesy of partner CONAP
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Local community members and residents of the project sites, courtesy of partner CONAP

A local community member and resident of the project site, courtesy of partner CONAP
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A local community member and resident of the project site, courtesy of partner CONAP

Local community members and residents of the project sites, courtesy of partner CONAP
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Local community members and residents of the project sites, courtesy of partner CONAP

The proposed 500K acres will store

121.3M

metric tons of carbon equivalents

Stop Land-grabbing and Illegal Activities on Indigenous Lands

Intact forests and threatened species face a growing menace as those seeking economic gain make inroads into Indigenous territories across the Amazon for nefarious purposes. Illegal mining, drug and land trafficking, logging and plantations cultivating the same crop year after year—such as coca for the drug trade—are a growing danger. Titling these territories will help prevent encroachment by outsiders and give communities legal recourse against the threats.

Newly titled territories will enable Indigenous people to maintain their traditional livelihoods in sustainable ways. At least 12 communities will be seeking legal recognition of their lands as Private Conservation Areas in addition to designation as Indigenous territories, providing an additional level of protection against conversion of the forests.

Save Rainforests and Rare Species in the Peruvian Amazon

An estimated 520 species of flora and fauna live within the proposed areas to be titled. While these community lands have yet to be fully cataloged, the rainforests here harbor eight threatened species of amphibians and eleven threatened bird species, including the Critically Endangered White-bellied Cinclodes and Sira Curassow.

Endangered mammal species living in the project landscape include the Andean Night Monkey, White-bellied Spider Monkey, Black-faced Black Spider Monkey, Peruvian Woolly Monkey, Giant Otter, Yellow-shouldered Bat and Rosalinda’s Oldfield Mouse. Vulnerable mammals include Northern Tiger Cat, Giant Armadillo, Dwarf Red Brocket and White-lipped Peccary.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS PROJECT >

 

The Brazilian Amazon rainforest

We Value Transparency.

Conservation work is critical, challenging, and can be costly. We work hard to ensure we raise only the funds needed for each project. In the rare case we raise more money than needed or a project comes in under budget, excess monies will be transferred to the Conservation Action Fund. This fund supports our important conservation work throughout the tropics.

Learn more about the Conservation Action FundLearn more about the Conservation Action Fund
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Partnering to Save Rainforest

Our partners’ ability to work with their governments and build strong connections with local communities ensures the successful implementation of our projects.

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