The Santa Marta Bush Tyrant of Colombia, by Agami Photo Agency
3X THE IMPACT

Protect Biodiversity in Colombia’s Sierra Nevada

Triple Your Donation!Triple Your Donation!
Project Overview

Mining, intensive tourism, urban settlements and coal ports are encroaching on this vulnerable land, threatening the survival of its biodiversity and the communities that live here.

  • Species at Risk

    Santa Marta Sabrewing (CR), Blue-billed Curassow (CR), Brown Spider Monkey (CR), Santa Marta Wren (CR), Blue-bearded Helmetcrest (CR), Santa Marta Bush-tyrant (EN), Carriker’s Mountain-tanager (EN), Santa Marta Parakeet (EN)

  • Carbon stored

    64,404,148 mT*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Resguardo Kogui Malayo Arhuaco (RKMA)

  • 426,154 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: $2,770,585
Funding Raised: $1,926,236

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Colombia
Acres

426,154

Project Overview

Mining, intensive tourism, urban settlements and coal ports are encroaching on this vulnerable land, threatening the survival of its biodiversity and the communities that live here.

  • Species at Risk

    Santa Marta Sabrewing (CR), Blue-billed Curassow (CR), Brown Spider Monkey (CR), Santa Marta Wren (CR), Blue-bearded Helmetcrest (CR), Santa Marta Bush-tyrant (EN), Carriker’s Mountain-tanager (EN), Santa Marta Parakeet (EN)

  • Carbon stored

    64,404,148 mT*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Resguardo Kogui Malayo Arhuaco (RKMA)

  • 426,154 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: £2,083,146
Funding Raised: £1,448,297

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Colombia
Acres

426,154

YOUR DONATION WILL HAVE

3X

the Impact! Your donation will be matched 2:1 thanks to the SAVES Challenge and the Bezos Earth Fund.

Project Overview

Northern Colombia’s Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta is a region of snow-covered mountains, wide valleys, primordial rainforests and crystal clean rivers that run to the Caribbean. Safeguarded by Indigenous Peoples for centuries, this coastal mountain range is a refuge for hundreds of threatened species. But mining, intensive tourism, urban settlements and coal ports are encroaching on this vulnerable land, threatening the survival of its biodiversity and the communities that live here.

With peaks reaching nearly 19,000 feet, Colombia’s Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta is the highest coastal mountain range in the tropics. With dramatic changes in altitude, distinct compositions of flora and fauna are found here in abundance, including many endemic and endangered species. Among the threatened species are the Brown Spider Monkey (CR), Red Crested Tree Rat (CR), Santa Marta White-fronted Capuchin (EN), Varied White-fronted Capuchin (EN) and Unicolored Oldfield Mouse (VU).

Explore Colombia’s Sierra Nevada

Colombia's Blue-billed Curassow, by Wolfehr
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Colombia's Blue-billed Curassow, by Wolfehr

Indigenous community members in Colombia’s Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, courtesy of RKMA
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Indigenous community members in Colombia’s Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, courtesy of RKMA

Brown Spider Monkey, Wikimedia Commons
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The Brown Spider Monkey, courtesy Wikimedia Commons

The Endangered Santa Marta Parakeet, photo by Rainforest Trust
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The Endangered Santa Marta Parakeet, photo by Rainforest Trust

The Endangered Varied White-fronted Capuchin, photo by Santiago Rosado/Fundación Biodiversa
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The Endangered Varied White-fronted Capuchin, photo by Santiago Rosado/Fundación Biodiversa

Santa Marta Bush Tyrant of Colombia, by Agami Photo Agency
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The endemic Santa Marta Bush Tyrant of Colombia, by Agami Photo Agency

Did you know?

64.4M

Metric tons of CO2 equivalents will be stored here

Threats

Stop Mining on Indigenous Ancestral Lands

Mining is a serious threat to the unique biodiversity of the Sierra Nevada and to Indigenous reservation lands in Colombia that are legally titled as Resguardos (territorial units made up of communal and inalienable lands). Although Resguardos status protects ancestral territories and the cultural and political self-government of Indigenous communities, it provides no legal protection against mining. In addition, increased pressure from new urban settlements, tourism and coal ports risk Santa Marta’s biodiversity and communities.

Rainforest Trust is partnering for the first time with an Indigenous-led organization—Resguardo Kogui Malayo Arhuaco—to expand the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta National Park by protecting 426,154 acres of Indigenous-owned land. This relationship with Resguardo Kogui Malayo Arhuaco is crucial to the success of the project. The land will then benefit from the highest level of environmental protection possible in Colombia—the only way to stop mining—while maintaining Indigenous ownership. These acres will be patrolled and supervised in collaboration with the Colombian National Parks authorities and the Kogui, Malayo and Arhuaco people.

The expansion of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta National Park is part of an Indigenous-led strategy to reclaim lost ancestral territories and sacred sites surrounding the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta known as “La Línea Negra” (the Black Line). This increased protection will also fortify ecological corridors for many species, from the lower terrain of the Sierra Nevada to the peaks, improving ecological resilience in the entire region.

Solutions

Support Cooperative Management Compatible with Conservation

Protecting this vital habitat will also strengthen collaboration between Indigenous Traditional Authorities and the Colombian government to create strong, culturally appropriate protected areas that benefit species, Indigenous communities and the planet.

Only sustainable, ancestral uses of the land by Indigenous Peoples will be permitted along with responsible stewardship activities. Indigenous national park staff members directly impacted by the project will participate in species monitoring and management activities—empowering Indigenous communities on their ancestral land.

Macaw

We Value Transparency.

Conservation work is critical, challenging, and can be costly. We work hard to ensure we raise only the funds needed for each project. In the rare case we raise more money than needed or a project comes in under budget, excess monies will be transferred to the Conservation Action Fund. This fund supports our important conservation work throughout the tropics.

Learn more about the Conservation Action FundLearn more about the Conservation Action Fund

Partnering to Save Rainforest

Our partners’ ability to work with their governments and build strong connections with local communities ensures the successful implementation of our projects.

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100% of your money goes to our conservation efforts

Our board members and other supporters cover our operating costs, so you can give knowing your whole gift will protect rainforests.

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