A Land Snail of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada
2X THE IMPACT

Create a Safe Haven for Endangered Snails in Cuba

Double Your Donation!Double Your Donation!
Project Overview

One of seven species of Polymitas, the Polymita sulphurosa lives in the only remaining habitat of the coastal forest here in Cuba.

  • Species at Risk

    Polymita sulphurosa (CR), Smalltooth Sawfish (CR), Gundlach’s Hawk (EN), Grey-headed Quail-dove (VU), Black-tailed Hutia (VU)

  • Carbon stored

    2,426,767 mT*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Wildlife Conservation Society

  • 22,574 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: $194,702
Funding Raised: $99,482

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Cuba
Acres

22,574

Project Overview

One of seven species of Polymitas, the Polymita sulphurosa lives in the only remaining habitat of the coastal forest here in Cuba.

  • Species at Risk

    Polymita sulphurosa (CR), Smalltooth Sawfish (CR), Gundlach’s Hawk (EN), Grey-headed Quail-dove (VU), Black-tailed Hutia (VU)

  • Carbon stored

    2,426,767 mT*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Wildlife Conservation Society

  • 22,574 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: £146,392
Funding Raised: £74,798

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Cuba
Acres

22,574

Your Donation Will Have

2X

the Impact! Every dollar you donate will be matched by a dollar, thanks to another generous donor.

Project Overview

Cuba’s coastal forests and sandy shores are one of the last refuges for many endemic land and coastal species. Here, along the northeastern shoreline, a thin ribbon of vegetation harbors the most beautiful snails on Earth. Sadly, the brilliant colors and patterns of the Critically Endangered Polymita sulphurosa have put them at risk of extinction as collectors illegally take them from the wild.

One of seven species of Polymitas, the Polymita sulphurosa lives in the only remaining habitat of the coastal forest here. Biodiversity studies conducted by our partners uncovered between 20,000 to 30,000 Polymita sulphurosa individuals in five isolated populations across this landscape.

Their allure, combined with the loss and degradation of their habitat, has led to a 97% decrease in their range. Because they depend on micro-habitats with very specific vegetation, they can easily be destroyed by any one incident that damages their small home.

In addition to these colorful snails, several endemic birds including the Gundlach’s Hawk (EN), Grey-headed Quail-dove (VU) and the Black-tailed Hutia (VU) also depend on this ecosystem for their survival.

(Header photo:  Painted land snails or Polymita sulphurosa of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada)

Explore the Cananovas

Colorful Land snails of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada
1 of 8

Colorful Polymita sulphurosa of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada

Colorful Land snails of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada
2 of 8

Colorful Polymita sulphurosa of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada

Smalltooth sawfish, by D Ross Robertson/wikipedia
3 of 8

Smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata), by D Ross Robertson/wikipedia

The landscape of the Cananovas, by Rey Estrada
4 of 8

The landscape of the Cananovas, by Rey Estrada

Colorful Land snails of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada
5 of 8

Colorful Polymita sulphurosa of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada

Colorful Land snails of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada
6 of 8

Colorful Polymita sulphurosa of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada

The landscape of the Cananovas, by Rey Estrada
7 of 8

The landscape of the Cananovas, by Rey Estrada

Colorful Land snails of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada
8 of 8

Colorful Polymita sulphurosa of the Cananovas in Cuba, by Rey Estrada

Did you know? Only

20 - 30K

Individual Polymita sulphurosa Exist Here

Save Biodiverse Coastal Forests for Snails, Birds and Sawfish

Rainforest Trust and our partner, Wildlife Conservation Society, together with the local Antonio Nuñez Jimenez Foundation, are working to create the new 22,574-acre Cananovas Habitat/Species Management Area in Cuba for critically endangered species. This project will fill a critical gap in coastal and marine protection near vital habitats in the Alejandro de Humboldt National Park with a group of wildlife refuges and protected areas in this extraordinary Cuban landscape.

Once protected, the proposed Cananovas Habitat/Species Management Area will also safeguard many endangered and endemic birds. Additionally, these acres—some marine—will safeguard the Smalltooth Sawfish (CR) found in the waters here. Cuba is one of only four Western Atlantic countries where the Smalltooth Sawfish (CR) still exists. Once common, the Smalltooth Sawfish (CR) is targeted for food and other uses. Unfortunately, its long-toothed rostrum makes it extremely vulnerable to entanglement in fishing gear. In addition to sheltering these endangered species, these acres will safely store 2,426,767 million mT of CO₂ equivalents.

Earlier this year, Rainforest Trust launched the first project in Cuba to protect 359,743 acres along the southern coast at Desembarco del Granma National Park. Once completed, this Marine Protected Area will safeguard Elkhorn Coral (CR), Great Hammerhead Shark (CR), Gudlach’s Hawk (EN), Whale Shark (EN) and the Hawksbill Sea Turtle (CR) among many other species.

Secure Marine Feeding Grounds

Deforestation and illegal harvesting of Cuba’s flora and fauna deprive coastal and marine species of food, nesting and sheltering grounds, increasing their risk of extinction. Once formally established, Cananovas Habitat/Species Management Area stakeholders will develop a coastal management plan that includes a monitoring and evaluation strategy of the ecosystem. Staff will be hired and trained to keep a watchful eye on the wellbeing of this habitat and its species. The ability to observe changes over time and develop targeted actions will ensure the conservation of this protected area.

Macaw

We Value Transparency.

Conservation work is critical, challenging, and can be costly. We work hard to ensure we raise only the funds needed for each project. In the rare case we raise more money than needed or a project comes in under budget, excess monies will be transferred to the Conservation Action Fund. This fund supports our important conservation work throughout the tropics.

Learn more about the Conservation Action FundLearn more about the Conservation Action Fund

100% of your money goes to our conservation efforts

Our board members and other supporters cover our operating costs, so you can give knowing your whole gift will protect rainforests.

Donate NowDonate Now
Loading