Status
Funded

Safeguard the “grandfather of the rivers” watershed in Colombia

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Project Overview

Tatamá is one of most biodiverse regions in Colombia and in the world.

  • Species at Risk

    Glittering Starfrontlet (EN), three Magnolia species (EN), Spectacled Bear (VU)

  • Carbon stored

    12,037,908*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Wildlife Conservation Society-Colombia

  • 59,746 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: $1,210,918
Funding Raised: $1,210,918

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Colombia
Acres

59,746

Project Overview

Tatamá is one of most biodiverse regions in Colombia and in the world.

  • Species at Risk

    Glittering Starfrontlet (EN), three Magnolia species (EN), Spectacled Bear (VU)

  • Carbon stored

    12,037,908*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Wildlife Conservation Society-Colombia

  • 59,746 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: £877,477
Funding Raised: £877,477

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Colombia
Acres

59,746

Project Overview

Colombia’s Tatamá National Park encompasses a rich tapestry of landscapes from páramo grasslands to lowland rainforests that are home to many endangered species found no place else on Earth, the Glittering Starfrontlet (EN) and three Endangered Magnolia species.

Meaning “grandfather of the rivers” in the Emberá-Chamí tradition, Tatamá is of great cultural and spiritual value to local traditional communities. Its rainforests supply water to Afro-Colombian, Indigenous and farming communities that live near the park.

But this extraordinary terrain is threatened by the expansion of agriculture and cattle ranching, logging, road construction, unregulated housing encroachment and gold mining that occurs along the slopes of the San Juan and Cauca rivers and elsewhere in the region.

Rainforest Trust and our partner, Wildlife Conservation Society-Colombia (WCS-Colombia) seek to expand the Tatamá National Natural Park by 59,746 acres to address encroaching threats and increase connectivity for vulnerable species in the Colombian Andes. (Header photo: Black-and-gold Tanager, by Cullen Hanks)

Did you know?

80%

of the proposed protected areas are covered by lush primary forests.

Explore Tatamá
The Endangered Glittering Starfrontlet, by ProAves
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The Endangered Glittering Starfrontlet, by ProAves

Spectacled Bear sitting in forest
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The Vulnerable Spectacled Bear, by Milton Rodriquez

Central Cordillera of the Andean mountains, in Colombia, by Exequiel Schvartz
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Central Cordillera of the Andean mountains, in Colombia, by Exequiel Schvartz

Chestnut-bellied Flowerpiercer, by Frank Smith
4 of 6

Chestnut-bellied Flowerpiercer, by Frank Smith

The Endangered Magnolia Polyhypsophylla
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The Endangered Magnolia Polyhypsophylla

Magnolia polyhypsophylla, one of hundreds of Magnolia species in Colombia.
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The flower of the Magnolia polyhypsophylla, one of hundreds of Magnolia species in Colombia.

The Threat

Protect an extraordinary number of endemic species

Tatamá is an Important Bird Area with 536 documented bird species, including 14 endemic to Colombia and four only found in the western Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. This rich landscape shelters the Endangered Glittering Starfrontlet, whose population is estimated at around 2,500 individuals and declining due to habitat loss and climate change.

Of 81 documented amphibian species present on the proposed expansion, 44 are endemic to Colombia, six are only found in Tatamá, and a number of them are Critically Endangered. The region is also home to 110 species of mammals, 108 species of reptiles, a vital array of plant life, including 564 species of orchids, and 700 species of butterflies.

The Solution

Advance solutions together with local communities

There are four local ethnic territories (two Afro-community councils and two Indigenous territories) in the vicinity of the park. Residents will be consulted about the expansion project and engaged throughout to assist with planning, biological surveys and management. Developing sustainable livelihood options for residents is a top priority.

Macaw

We Value Transparency.

Conservation work is critical, challenging, and can be costly. We work hard to ensure we raise only the funds needed for each project. In the rare case we raise more money than needed or a project comes in under budget, excess monies will be transferred to the Conservation Action Fund. This fund supports our important conservation work throughout the tropics.

Learn more about the Conservation Action FundLearn more about the Conservation Action Fund
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Partnering to Save Rainforest

Our partners’ ability to work with their governments and build strong connections with local communities ensures the successful implementation of our projects.

Wildlife Conservation SocietyWildlife Conservation Society

100% of your money goes to our conservation efforts

Our board members and other supporters cover our operating costs, so you can give knowing your whole gift will protect rainforests.

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