Status
Protected

Protecting Endangered Pangolins in the North Western Ghats of India

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Project Overview

The moist deciduous forests of India’s North Western Ghats offer one of the most species-rich ecosystems in South Asia.

  • Species at Risk

    4

  • Carbon stored

    n/a*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Applied Environmental Research Foundation (AERF)

  • 2114 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: $223,554
Funding Raised: $223,554

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

India
Acres

2114

Project Overview

The moist deciduous forests of India’s North Western Ghats offer one of the most species-rich ecosystems in South Asia.

  • Species at Risk

    4

  • Carbon stored

    n/a*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Applied Environmental Research Foundation (AERF)

  • 2114 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: £161,995
Funding Raised: £161,995

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

India
Acres

2114

The moist deciduous forests of India’s North Western Ghats offer one of the most species-rich ecosystems in South Asia. A mountain range rising to over 8,500 feet, the Ghats intercept the wet monsoon winds off the Arabian Sea.

The resulting precipitation and cooler temperatures create numerous microclimates that are necessary to shelter endangered species such as the Indian Pangolin, Dhole, Gaur and a striking variety of endemic plants.

Though as rich in biodiversity as the South Western Ghats, the North Western Ghats have received much less attention in terms of research and conservation funding. Due to this lack of attention, vital habitats on private lands are severely threatened as the current protected area system does not completely safeguard the many different types of ecosystems in the region.

Despite their high biodiversity value, the Districts of Raigad, Ratnagiri and Sindhudurg are particularly under protected. Importantly, these sites lie in an area where the moist deciduous forests of the North Western Ghats overlap the moist forests of the Malabar Coast, and they are situated in an important wildlife corridor that connects the pre-existing Sahyadri Tiger Reserve, Amba Forest Reserve and Chandoli National Park.

To strengthen protection of this key area, Rainforest Trust is working with local partner Applied Environmental Research Foundation (AERF) to create the new Prachitgad Community Reserve. Utilizing conservation agreements, the new reserve will immediately stop unsustainable clearing of forest in the area. Essential conditions of these agreements require no felling of trees, cattle grazing, laying of traps nor hunting, thereby allowing this amazingly rich forest to rebound and thrive for the species that depend on it.

Did you know?

80

species of birds were revealed in the reserve area.

Explore the Prachitgad Community Reserve

The Endangered Dhole, or Asiatic Wild Dog, by Dr. Ajay Kumar Singh
1 of 3

The Endangered Dhole, or Asiatic Wild Dog, by Dr. Ajay Kumar Singh

2 of 3

The Vulnerable Gaur

3 of 3

The Vulnerable Sambar Deer courtesy of N.A. Naseer

The Threat

The greatest threat to the forests of the North Western Ghats comes from the removal of trees for wood fuel, agriculture and development. Many of these important habitats found on private lands are under severe pressure.

An ongoing lack of forest management can lead to natural disasters like landslides, while contributing to the loss of important biodiversity and habitats. Poaching, smuggling and violations of other wildlife regulations have become problematic in many of India’s traditionally managed protected areas. The relatively new category of Community Reserve within the Indian protected area designation system seeks to change this perspective and alleviate this problem.

 

 

What We're Doing

Rainforest Trust is working with local partner Applied Environmental Research Foundation (AERF) to protect 2,114 acres of the North Western Ghats moist deciduous forest by establishing the new Pratchigad Community Reserve.

Conservation agreements with local community landowners will immediately put an end to indiscriminate tree felling and other unsustainable forest uses. Management and protection of forests will occur through these agreements, offering direct incentives like ecotourism and sustainable harvests to local communities. Important conditions of these agreements include no felling of trees, cattle grazing, laying of traps or hunting. Community members are employed to monitor the forests and collect non-timber forest products. The new Pratchigad Community Reserve will be overseen through a multi-stakeholder management committee comprised of representatives from the community and local forestry department. Local people will be recruited as forest guards and conservation stewards, and educational materials and camera traps will be employed to further support the ongoing protection of this vital area.

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