Urgent Project

Create a Wildlife Corridor for Tigers in Thailand

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Project Overview

The largest of all big cats, the Tiger once roamed freely throughout central, eastern and southern Asia.

  • Species at Risk

    Sunda Pangolin (CR), Tiger (EN), Asian Elephant (EN), Banteng (EN)

  • Carbon stored

    8,341,020*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Panthera

  • 100,843 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: $992,632
Funding Raised: $460,220

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Thailand
Acres

100,843

Project Overview

The largest of all big cats, the Tiger once roamed freely throughout central, eastern and southern Asia.

  • Species at Risk

    Sunda Pangolin (CR), Tiger (EN), Asian Elephant (EN), Banteng (EN)

  • Carbon stored

    8,341,020*

    *(metric tons of CO2 equivalents)
  • Partner

    Panthera

  • 100,843 Acres Conserved by

    Designation

Project Cost: £719,298
Funding Raised: £333,492

Please note that your donation may not be immediately reflected in the funding thermometer above.

Thailand
Acres

100,843

Create a wildlife corridor for tigers in Thailand 

The largest of all big cats, the Tiger once roamed freely throughout central, eastern and southern Asia, but in the past century alone, rapid habitat loss has caused this majestic animal to lose more than 93% of its historic range. Compounded with poaching, populations have dropped from 100,000 to just 3,500.

The Western Forest Complex in Thailand, encompassing 7,232 square miles of forest habitat along the border with Myanmar, is home to the only viable population of Tigers in mainland Southeast Asia. The country’s conservation victories in this landscape have rendered it a stronghold for threatened species, but three areas have been identified as critical gaps in urgent need of our protection. 

Rainforest Trust and our partner, Panthera have the incredible opportunity to safeguard these gaps by creating three new protected areas. 

Did you know?

100,843

acres will solidify a new vast wildlife corridor.

Explore Thailand

Indochinese Tiger caught on camera trap, courtesy of partner, Panthera
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An Indochinese Tiger caught on camera trap, courtesy of partner, Panthera

The Endangered White-crowned Hornbill sits in a tree in the forests of Thailand
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The Endangered White-crowned Hornbill, by Wang Thammachatudom

The project landscape, by partner Panthera
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The project landscape, by partner Panthera

The Endangered Dhole, or Asiatic Wild Dog, by Dr. Ajay Kumar Singh
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The Endangered Dhole, or Asiatic Wild Dog, by Dr. Ajay Kumar Singh

The Critically Endangered Siamese Crocodile, or freshwater crocodile.
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The Critically Endangered Siamese Crocodile, by ONGUSHI/shutterstock

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Endangered Banteng, from Shutterstock

A Sun Bear with its tongue sticking out
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The Vulnerable Sun Bear, by Vladmir Wrangler

The Endangered Asian Elephant, by Dennis Jarvis/Flickr
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The Endangered Asian Elephant, by Dennis Jarvis/Flickr

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Sunda Pangolin (CR) Courtesy of Chien Lee

The Threat

Save habitat for Asian Elephants and other threatened species

In addition to Tigers, the potential sites will save critical habitat for Asian Elephants (EN), whose populations have been declining for centuries. Although it is difficult to count elephants in Thailand’s dense vegetation, there are estimated to be at most about 3,300 surviving today. Herds of over 100 individuals have been spotted roaming, making these areas vital in the species’ protection.

Other at-risk, globally important species have been recorded here as well including Asiatic Wild Dog or Dhole (EN), Banteng (EN), Leopard (VU), Clouded Leopard (VU), Sambar (VU), Bearcat (VU), Sun Bear (VU) and Asiatic Black Bear (VU). The Endangered Green Peafowl and three species of hornbill listed as Vulnerable also inhabit the reserve areas. The Lar Gibbon (EN) and the Large-spotted Civet also live there.

The Solution

Support sustainable solutions for human-wildlife coexistence

Together, we can secure and connect vital missing pieces of a conservation landscape that includes national parks and wildlife sanctuaries critical to the survival of keystone species and wide-ranging species like Tigers and Asian Elephants to move safely across the land.

Official designation of these protected areas by Thailand’s Department of Natural Resources brings funding and personnel who are trained and empowered to enforce Thailand’s conservation laws that regulate destructive activities like mining, poaching and illegal cattle ranching.

Local community members will help develop plans to address land use concerns in a way that will protect people’s traditional forest practices and benefit resident species at the same time. The peaceful coexistence of humans and non-human species within the protected environment is a guiding goal.

Macaw

We Value Transparency.

Conservation work is critical, challenging, and can be costly. We work hard to ensure we raise only the funds needed for each project. In the rare case we raise more money than needed or a project comes in under budget, excess monies will be transferred to the Conservation Action Fund. This fund supports our important conservation work throughout the tropics.

Learn more about the Conservation Action FundLearn more about the Conservation Action Fund

100% of your money goes to our conservation efforts

Our board members and other supporters cover our operating costs, so you can give knowing your whole gift will protect rainforests.

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