Canandé Herpetological Community the Most Diverse Outside the Amazon

Ethan Freedman

Oct 19, 2017

Species

Rainforest Trust is currently helping expand Ecuador’s Rio Canandé Reserve by 3,754 acres. Home to a number of threatened species, including the Great Green Macaw and Brown-headed Spider Monkey, the reserve is now also home to the highest number of amphibians and reptiles in any place outside the Amazon.

A recent biological survey in Ecuador’s Rio Canandé Reserve uncovered many species of reptiles and amphibians not previously seen in the reserve. Scientists now believe there are 123 different species of reptiles and amphibians, making the reserve the most herpetologically diverse area in the world outside the Amazon. With potential further growth of the project, this number could increase to around 136 species. The survey was conducted by the conservation groups Fundación Jocotoco and Tropical Herping, and was supported by Rainforest Trust.

Regarding the survey and conservation efforts to expand Canandé Reserve, Rainforest Trust’s Director of Conservation Programs James Lewis said, “We have learned over the years that there are massive benefits to preserving as much pristine rainforest and other habitats as possible; however, both time and resources are limited so research like this helps us better understand where we should be focusing our efforts.”

“As Rainforest Trust supports more efforts like this around the world, we will be able to put our experience into action by taking the research and turning it into long-term, effective protected areas for the world’s most threatened species.”

Ranging from tiny frogs to giant boas, the Canandé herp community is an eclectic bunch.

Let’s meet a few of the more eccentric individuals, shall we?

The Mache Glassfrog (Cochranella mache). IUCN Listing: Endangered. Photo by Tropical Herping.

 

A Veronica’s Anole (Anolis festae). IUCN Listing: Least Concern. Photo by Tropical Herping.

 

The Graceful Snail-eater (Dipsas gracilis). Not evaluated by IUCN. Photo by Tropical Herping

 

 

 

 

The Toachi Rocket Frog (Hyloxalus toachi). IUCN Listing: Endangered. Photo by Tropical Herping.

 

The Colombia Wood Turtle (Rhinoclemmys melanosterna). Not evaluated by IUCN. Photo by Tropical Herping.

 

The Rainbow Galliwasp (Diploglossus monotropis). IUCN Status: Least Concern. Photo by Tropical Herping.

The Redtail Coral Snake (Micrurus mipartitus), one of the species just found in the Canandé reserve. IUCN Status: Least Concern. Photo by Tropical Herping.

 

The Little Devil (Oophaga sylvatica). IUCN Status: Least Concern. Photo by Tropical Herping.

 

The South American Snapping Turtle (Chelydra acutirostris), another of the newly found species in Canandé. Not evaluated by IUCN. Photo by Tropical Herping.

The Blue-thighed Snouted Treefrog (Scinax sugillatus), recently found for the first time in the Canandé reserve. IUCN Status: Least Concern. Photo by Tropical Herping.

 

Teresita’s Coffee-snake (Ninia teresitae), just found in the Canandé reserve. Not evaluated by IUCN. Photo by Tropical Herping.

 

For More Information and to Support this Project: Strategic Land Purchase to Expand Habitat Protection in the Chocó of Ecuador